life:

We are sad to report that Cal Whipple, a former LIFE correspondent, died on March 17th at the age of 94. Whipple played a huge role in getting this groundbreaking photograph of three dead American soldiers published in LIFE magazine — a fight he took all the way to the White House.
The New York Times writes:

Mr. Whipple and his colleagues at Life believed that Mr. Strock’s photograph would provide a badly needed dose of reality for those on the home front who were growing complacent about the war effort. “I went from Army captain to major to colonel to general,” he recalled in a memoir written for his family, “until I wound up in the office of an assistant secretary of the Air Corps, who decided, ‘This has to go to the White House.’ ”
(via NYTimes)

(George Strock—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images)

life:

We are sad to report that Cal Whipple, a former LIFE correspondent, died on March 17th at the age of 94. Whipple played a huge role in getting this groundbreaking photograph of three dead American soldiers published in LIFE magazine — a fight he took all the way to the White House.

The New York Times writes:

Mr. Whipple and his colleagues at Life believed that Mr. Strock’s photograph would provide a badly needed dose of reality for those on the home front who were growing complacent about the war effort. “I went from Army captain to major to colonel to general,” he recalled in a memoir written for his family, “until I wound up in the office of an assistant secretary of the Air Corps, who decided, ‘This has to go to the White House.’ ”

(via NYTimes)

(George Strock—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images)

life:

Billie Holiday sings her standard, “Fine and Mellow” in LIFE photographer Gjon Mili’s studio. See more photos here. 
 (Gjon Mili—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images)

life:

Billie Holiday sings her standard, “Fine and Mellow” in LIFE photographer Gjon Mili’s studio. See more photos here.

 (Gjon Mili—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images)

thenewinquiry:

Some or all depression derives from political despair, as Cvetkovich rightly situates it —although I would have liked for the book to have carried through on its original promise, to look more closely and critically at the cultural components of depression, at how it really is a public feeling (as opposed to keeping depression, as Cvetkovich mostly does, inside.) Depression can be political, can be a process of breaking through. What others—family members and bosses, in television commercials—see as depression can be in fact the use of one’s own body as a site of refusal to participate and function fully in capitalism, (hetero)normative social behavior, or gendered labor: an ongoing space to cultivate one’s self as a political and sovereign subject by shutting down. Why is Cvetkovich in such a hurry to get over depression? 
-Kate Zambreno, “Melancholy and the Infinite Sadness”

thenewinquiry:

Some or all depression derives from political despair, as Cvetkovich rightly situates it —although I would have liked for the book to have carried through on its original promise, to look more closely and critically at the cultural components of depression, at how it really is a public feeling (as opposed to keeping depression, as Cvetkovich mostly does, inside.) Depression can be political, can be a process of breaking through. What others—family members and bosses, in television commercials—see as depression can be in fact the use of one’s own body as a site of refusal to participate and function fully in capitalism, (hetero)normative social behavior, or gendered labor: an ongoing space to cultivate one’s self as a political and sovereign subject by shutting down. Why is Cvetkovich in such a hurry to get over depression? 

-Kate Zambreno, “Melancholy and the Infinite Sadness”

"In economic affairs, The Wealth of Nations (1776) popularized the “invisible hand,” the idea that an individual who “intends only his own gain,” is, as it were, “led by an invisible hand to promote…the public interest.” Adam Smith did not assert that this was invariably true, and perhaps neither did any of his followers. But he contributed to a dominant tendency of thought that has ever since interfered with positive action based on rational analysis, namely, the tendency to assume that decisions reached individually will, in fact, be the best decisions for an entire society."

- Garrett Hardin, Tragedy of the Commons

"We are still the generation who went into an illegal war. And the guy who took us there is giving lectures around the world and sitting in his lovely house with an armed guard. Every time I sing those words, I think of him sitting there. Thinking, what the fuck, how did we let him get away with that?"

- Thom Yorke on Tony Blair http://m.guardian.co.uk/music/2013/feb/23/thom-yorke-radiohead-interview

scottlava:

“Shall we stop this bleeding?”
OSCARS WEEK: Day 1

scottlava:

“Shall we stop this bleeding?”

OSCARS WEEK: Day 1

"Remember that NVivo can help you to manage, explore and find patterns in your data but it cannot replace your analytical expertise."

- NVivo 10 Getting Started Guide

guardianmusic:

Here are some cameraphone photos which I took at last night’s incredible opening show of Kraftwerk’s run at London’s Tate Modern (several were snapped through the 3D glasses). It was nominally the Autobahn show but quickly morphed into a greatest hits set. You can read Alexis Petridis’s review of a quite magical night here. CS 

"I agree with Albert Einstein that socialism is humanity’s attempt “to overcome and advance beyond the predatory phase of human development.” Every market, even a socialist market, is a system of predation. Our attempt to get beyond predation has thus far failed. I do not think the right conclusion is to give up."

- Gerald Allan Cohen in Why Not Socialism?